Chinese Lunar New Year Explanation

Chinese Lunar New Year - Click to enlarge


A few days before the new year begins, families clean their houses and home altars, and apply a new coat of red paint to doors and window frames. On New Year's Eve, families eat the traditional "Nian Ye Fan" dinner of fish (representing plenitude), with dumplings served around midnight for luck. Then, New Year's Day is celebrated with fireworks, firecrackers, lion dancing, red envelopes, and visits to the eldest members of one's family.

The second day of the new year is a time for married daughters to visit their families, and a time to surprise Fido with special new treats, since it's the birthday of all dogs. Tradition demands that everyone stay at home on the third day of the new year, since it's bad luck to go visiting, and the fourth day is the day when sons-in-law pay respects to their wives' parents. Day Five is the God of Wealth's birthday, while Days Six through Ten are for visiting family and friends, attending the temple, and feasting in honor of the Jade Emperor.

After so much great food, Days Ten through Twelve are a time to eat lighter fare with friends, leading up to a day of vegetarian meals on Day Thirteen to counteract previous days of indulgence. The Chinese God of War, Guan Yu, is also celebrated across the country on Day Thirteen, as his success in battle is something every business wants to emulate. Day Fourteen is spent preparing for the culmination of new year's celebrations on Day Fifteen, the Lantern Festival, during which families light lanterns to guide wayward spirits home.

Celebrate the new year with something special for your home!




Chinese Year of the Horse

Chinese New Year 2011<BR>Year of the Rabbit
Chinese Year of the Horse

Began January 31, 2014
Chinese New Year 2011
Year of the Rabbit


Began February 3, 2011

Chinese Year of the Tiger

Chinese Year of the Rat
Chinese Year of the Tiger

Began February 14, 2010
Chinese Year of the Rat

Began February 7, 2008